Erika Romero

PhD Candidate and Education Blogger

Category: Teaching Tips (page 1 of 6)

How to Start Teaching Online Without Feeling Overwhelmed

As universities continue going online with their courses as the COVID-19 spreads, I thought it’d be beneficial to offer some tips on how to use your LMS class website and other free digital tools when teaching from home. My university uses a version of Sakai as our LMS software, but I’d assume similar tools are available in other systems. Plus, the free tools I mention in the second half of this post are available to anyone with internet access (and in two cases, a Mac). If you’re required to switch to online teaching unexpectedly, this post is for you.

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Tips for Creating a Group Project that Students Won’t Hate

Today’s blog post is intended to help you design a group project that your students will not only learn a lot from, but also one that students actually enjoy. If you’ve assigned one before, I’m sure you are familiar with the frustration many students feel when completing a good project. I believe this assignment type is essential, though, so I’m not willing to give up using it in my courses. If you’re looking for ready-made group project examples, I already have a post on my literary analysis project and one on my multimodal genre remediation project. The first assignment is the one I mention throughout the video included in today’s post. If you’re unsure about how to grade a group project that involves different elements, you can also watch my video on using weighted unit grading. But, let’s turn our focus onto assignment design.

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14 Benefits of Teaching with Technology (EdTech Tips)

As someone who uses technology in her classroom basically every day, I’m amazed whenever I hear someone say that they are unsure of how to integrate digital tools into their teaching. Sure, they use the projector and computer in the classroom, but that’s about as far as they go. If you’re still collecting tons of paper from your students, I definitely recommend trying out some of my suggestions on integrating digital tools and assignments into your courses. [If you’re teaching online and want some activity ideas, check out this blog post.] I have an older video about whether or not students should be able to use their phones and laptops in class, but the new videos in this post dive deeper into EdTech possibilities and benefits.

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Dealing with Public Speaking Anxiety as a Teacher

It might seem impossible for someone with a fear of public speaking to become a successful teacher who enjoys their career. Teachers are constantly required to present information to an audience and facilitate learning for groups of people. How can they do that if they feel anxious when speaking in public? As someone whose heart races every time she needs to present at a conference or in front of colleagues, I have plenty of experience dealing with this problem. I don’t get as anxious when I’m in the classroom, but that doesn’t mean the fear goes away entirely. Here are some approaches I take to deal with public speaking anxiety as a college instructor.

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5 Common Teaching Problems and Their Quick Solutions

It’s inevitable that teaching problems will pop up each semester, though some issues are bigger than others. Finding solutions on the fly can be tough, so I thought I’d offer a few solutions to common teaching problems that I definitely encounter pretty often. Going in prepared to deal with these issues makes teaching a lot easier, especially during your first few years teaching. Here are five teaching problems and multiple ways to go about solving them.

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How to Communicate with Shy Students

We are more than halfway through the semester, so hopefully you’ve been able to get most of your students speaking up during class discussions. If you’ve done a Midterm Chat, then you also have a good idea of what students consider to be stronger and weaker elements of your teaching style. But, there are probably still some shy students that you are having trouble getting to speak up in class. They sit quietly in their seats and seem to be listening to your lectures and the class discussions, but you have no idea what their voices sound like. In today’s post, I go over three strategies for communicating with shy students, or those who are just too self-conscious to ask questions in class. If you’d rather see a video version of these strategies, that’s an option for you, too.

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